• Flower Farming - Gardening - Seed Starting

    How to Do a Basic Seed-Starting Setup

    When you first get into flower farming or cut flower growing, you quickly realize that you almost surely are going to need to learn how to start your own plants from seed. Not only is it more economical (at least at first) to start your own seeds, but sometimes logistically, it’s one of the only ways to get the specialty kinds of plants you need for cutting. For example, where we live, there are only a couple places nearby where you can buy plants at all — our local Walmart (the only chain grocery store we have in our whole…

  • Flower Farming - Recommended Resources

    The 5 Must-Own Flower Farming Books

    With the exploding trend of the backyard flower farming movement, there have been a LOT of books released in the past few years on flower farming, cut flower growing, and floral design based on seasonal flowers. Because books are basically my love language, I’ve bought nearly all of them (#truth), but I only consider about a handful to be “must-owns.” The rest are awesome to have, yes, and I can never get enough information, pictures, and poetic musings on the profession I love so much, but when it comes to the nitty gritty of actually flower farming, you will get…

  • Flower Farming - Gardening - What's Blooming Monthly

    What’s Blooming in Utah in April?

    If you’re trying to plan a cut flower garden or flower farm in Utah and wonder what kinds of blooms you can expect in April, then this post is for you! This is also a good list to keep in mind if you’re planning a wedding or other event in Utah and want to use locally grown flowers for that. Some important things to consider: Note: There may be affiliate links to books and products mentioned. April Cut Flowers Hyacinths I think hyacinths are overrated as a landscape flower, but I love them as a cut flower. They have a…

  • Flower Farming - Monthly To-Do List

    What Does a Flower Farmer Do in April?

    Continuing our month-by-month series, today‚Äôs post details all the major tasks on the to-do list for April. Even though winter is (technically) behind us, I always have to prepare myself for a few weather surprises in April, both on the (very) cold side–we’re talking sometimes down into the low teens–and also on the very warm side. April marks the official beginning of our flower farming season to the public since it’s when our first subscription bouquets go out with the first harvested blooms, which are usually daffodils, hyacinths, and early tulips. Out of all the months in our year, April…

  • Flower Farming - Monthly To-Do List

    What Does a Flower Farmer Do in March?

    Continuing our month-by-month series, today’s post details all the major tasks on the to-do list for March. As March is unpredictable and still considered winter, the month is full of all sorts of crazy weather ups and downs. On the sunny, milder days, we’re pretty much always outside taking advantage and doing some kind of work out on the farm. On the days when winter is reluctant to release her grip and snow is falling (or just refusing to melt), there are still plenty of indoor chores to be working on as well. Below is the list of all our…

  • Flower Farming - Monthly To-Do List

    What Does a Flower Farmer Do in February?

    Continuing our monthly series, today’s post is all about some of the expected farm chores for February. While February in our part of the world (Central Utah) is still very much winter, the increasing daylight and closer proximity to the arrival of spring means that flower farming tasks definitely pick up a bit compared to January. There are seeds in our basement, plants in the beds that look like they might have successfully overwintered, and weeds already taking advantage in the high tunnel. Here’s what’s on the docket for the month: Note: There are affiliate links to products and books…

  • Flower Farming - Monthly To-Do List

    What Does a Flower Farmer Do in January?

    You might think that flower farming is only seasonal — that it only lasts from the last frost until the first frost. FALSE. The fact is, flower farming is a year-round profession (regardless of climate or hardiness zone), just simply because there’s so much work to do even in the “off” season. With two full seasons under my belt, I can confidently say that the only “real” break I have happens in December, when I (usually) don’t have much to do with the farm. But the rest of the year, I keep pleeenty busy. Here’s what’s happening on the flower…

  • Flower Farming - Small Business Owner

    How to Start a Small Flower Farm [Part V]: Avoiding Burnout + Managing Expectations

    This post is part five in our five-part series all about how to start your own small-scale flower farm. Make sure you check out the other posts in the series first so you’re caught up to speed: Part One: Business Plan + Site Selection Part Two: What to Grow + Planning Your Year Part Three: Marketing + Building a Customer Base Part Four: Harvesting + Arranging I would wager a bet that most people who get into flower farming are dreamers. We love to envision the fields of blooms and crates of wrapped bouquets for the market, and we love…

  • Flower Farming - Small Business Owner

    How to Start a Small Flower Farm [Part IV]: Harvesting + Arranging

    This post is part four in our five-part series all about how to start your own small-scale flower farm. Make sure you check out the other posts in the series first so that you’re caught up to speed: Part One: Business Plan + Site Selection Part Two: What to Grow + Planning Your Year Part Three: Marketing + Building a Customer Base So you’ve finally managed to grow some flowers, and you’re ready to actually start selling them. Where to start? Just as in most things with flower farming, the learning curve will seem steep at first. You might very…

  • Flower Farming - Small Business Owner

    How to Start a Small Flower Farm [Part III]: Marketing + Building a Customer Base

    This post is part three of a five-part series detailing how to start a small-scale flower farm. You can find part one HERE (all about general business plan and site selection) and part two HERE (which is all about what to actually plant). Note: There are affiliate links to books and products mentioned. The Importance of Marketing You might think, as so many of us in the flower farming world did when we first started out, that your end product is so beautiful that it will practically sell itself. Unique, locally-grown flowers? Who WOULDN’T want that?! Unfortunately, it’s not that…